Coconut Milk Ice Creams :: Golden Milk w/Ginger + Double Chocolate Cookie

August 20, 2017

I’ve been reading a lot about Chinese + Ayurvedic and herbal medicine lately, learning about adaptogenic herbs and the importance of amino-fying, alkalizing, mineralizing and rewilding our bodies. I came home from SO much travel earlier this summer determined to feel better in my own skin. Even though I eat quite virtuously, I was sure that there was more. 

Culinary school will educate you on all sorts of magical techniques, but it doesn’t educate you on the magic of FOOD. The way it heals, the incredible properties and powers it has to help us not only survive but thrive in the world. In fact, it’s entirely possible to weave your way through your career as a chef and never care one iota about what happens to the food you cook the moment it enters into the bodies of your diners. Most chefs report that they love taking care of others, that they love satisfying the souls of their guests through taste memories. But what if we – as chefs – could literally care for the souls of our diners by providing them with different combinations of foods that help them heal and thrive? I’m not just talking about eating organics, and sustainably raised products here. I’m talking about a whole slew of herbs and ingredients, food combinations, recipes and cooking techniques that most chefs never use (or even think about.)

The book I’ve been enjoying most on the subject is by Amanda Chantal Bacon – founder of MoonJuice – and the creator of crazy wonderful magic potions and dusts for brains, bodies, libido…ever heard of Sex Dust? Amanda created that. But she also wrote a completely lovely cookbook that introduces us to ingredients she’s encountered, cooks with and lives by that boost our experience as human beings (instead of just making us not-hungry anymore.) The recipes within the book are all vegan and mostly raw, though she doesn’t push a vegan or raw agenda. Instead, she invites her readers to consider for themselves how to incorporate the wisdom and magic of these ingredients into their lives. And so that’s what I’ve been doing. (Enter, adaptogenic, digestively superior ice cream – I mean, right?!) 

Ok, ice cream wasn’t at all the first recipe I tried, or the first ritual I’ve been creating here at home, but I have been playing with some fun ingredients and a few ended up here. Admittedly, at first, I was a little bit skeptical of the practices and recipes that Amanda laid down. I’m not a vegan. I’m not a vegetarian. (Though I eat WAY more fruits and vegetables than many who practice both of those diets!) I had one bout in college when I was studying environmental economics and GMO’s and was petrified to eat anything but oatmeal for a few months, but that’s the most restricted I’ve really ever been with what I eat. Instead, I refer to myself as a selectarian. I know where my meat comes from – like, the farmer who raised it. I choose cheeses wisely, from producers I know. And I eat whatever strikes my fancy in moderation. 

Anyway – green juices in the morning, prebiotic teas to calm at night and healthy sprinkles of herbs, spices, mushrooms and other healthy compounds whenever I feel like it. Sometimes, a scoop of amazing coconut ice cream to soothe digestion and boost well-being. (Seriously!) 

So, these recipes. Jeni Britton Bauer is a girl-crush of mine and her “cremé sans lait” recipe has been very liberally adapted to create the ice creams you see here. (Her ice cream cookbooks are absolute must-haves. These are kind of like “alter-ego ice creams” really; the virtuous, soothing-spice laden, ginger -aced Golden Milk version, and the Double Dark Chocolate version. Balance in the universe if you will. Both are dairy free, and both contain ingredients that I think you’ll find surprising when it comes to ice cream. Both recipes call for sugar (I use organic,) and corn syrup for texture. Mind you this is NOT at all the same thing as using high-fructose corn syrup and its a very small amount to keep the ice cream from becoming chunky or icy, and it stays smooth and creamy without added stabilizers (which your body recognizes as toxic non-foods.) If you’re absolutely against these two ingredients you’re welcome to substitute them for coconut sugar or maple sugar and maple syrup or glucose syrup respectively, but do keep in mind that the texture of your ice cream will be less stable and quite a bit different than mine here. 

Other ingredients and notes: the recipe calls for cashew butter for its mild flavor and neutral color, but you could choose almond butter or another nut butter of your choosing. Just know that the flavor and appearance of the ice cream will be a bit different. Don’t have cashew butter on hand? You can make your own by blending 1/2 cup of raw cashews in the food processor until smooth. 

One more thing: you’ll need an ice cream maker here and you’ll want to be sure the canisters are frozen before you start making the base. 

I’m gonna save all the good health benefit of the ingredients like turmeric, black pepper, coconut, cacao, cinnamon etc mumbo-jumbo for another post, and instead hope that this one inspires you to think of using different flavors and ingredients in new ways. Makes you want to rethink how you consider foods and a personal diet. Subscribing to a regiment set down by someone else is easy, following the “rules,” but frankly this rarely suits bodies. Instead, think about how you feel, and how what you feel can be impacted by what you eat. (Like, ice cream.) 

Double Chocolate Cookie Coconut Ice Cream
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Ingredients
  1. 2 3/4 cups coconut or almond milk
  2. 2 tablespoons tapioca starch
  3. 1/2 cup cashew butter
  4. 2 ounces vegan cream cheese such as Kite Hill
  5. 1 1/4 cups refined coconut oil
  6. 3/4 cup sugar
  7. 1/3 cup light corn syrup
  8. 3/4 cup strongly brewed coffee
  9. 1/2 cup sugar
  10. 1/2 cup dutch processed cocoa powder
  11. 1-2 cups favorite cookie crumbs (preferably Double Chocolate)
Instructions
  1. First, prep your ingredients: Mix about 2 tablespoons of the coconut milk in a small bowl with the tapioca starch to make a smooth slurry. Set aside.
  2. In a 2-quart saucepan over medium heat, combine the coffee, cocoa powder and sugar. Warm, stirring frequently, until the sugar is dissolved. Remove from heat and set aside.
  3. In a medium to large bowl, mix together the cashew butter and vegan cream cheese and salt with the coconut oil using a plastic spatula, pressing stirring until smooth. Add the chocolate-coffee mixture and stir until smooth.
  4. Lastly, fill another large bowl with ice and water and set aside a ziploc bag.
  5. Next, cook the ice cream base: combine the remaining coconut milk base with the sugar, corn syrup in a 4-quart saucepan over medium-high heat until bubbling. Remove the pan from the head and slowly drizzle in the tapioca starch slurry, whisking constantly to incorporate. REturn the mixture to heat and bring to a boil over medium-high heat, then reduce to a simmer and let simmer for 30 seconds (until the mixture thickens slightly.) You can test for thickening by dipping a rubber spatula into the mixture then running your finger through the warm mixture on the spatula. If your finger leaves a trail that lasts several seconds, the mixture is amply thickened! Remove from the heat.
  6. Now, chill your base: gradually whisk the thickened coconut milk base into the smooth chocolate cream cheese mixture, stirring until well-incorporated. Transfer the mixture to a blender or food processor. (If you have an immersion blender, you can buzz the mixture here to ensure its well combined.) Blend on high for 3 minutes or until the mixture is completely homogenous. Then, pour the mixture into a 1-gallon ziploc bag and submerge the bag in the ice bath. Let stand until cold, at least 30 minutes. Add ice as needed, or transfer to the refrigerator to speed the cooking process.
  7. Lastly, freeze your ice cream: remove your frozen ice cream canister from the freezer and assemble your ice cream machine, then turn it on. Remove the chilled base from the ice bath and pour it into the canister. Spin until thick and creamy. Once adequately creamy, pack the ice cream into an airtight storage container, alternating with the cookie crumbs with scoops of ice cream, and press a sheet of parchment directly against the surface of the cream, then seal with an airtight lid. Freeze in the coldest part of your freezer until firm - roughly 4 hours - and enjoy!
LentineAlexis http://LentineAlexis.com/
Golden Milk Coconut Ice Cream w/Ginger + Cacao Nib
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Ingredients
  1. 2 3/4 cups full-fat coconut milk
  2. 2 tablespoons tapioca starch
  3. 1/2 cup cashew butter
  4. 2 ounces vegan cream cheese such as Kite Hill
  5. 1 1/4 cups refined coconut oil
  6. 3/4 cup sugar
  7. 1/3 cup light corn syrup
  8. 1 vanilla bean, split and scraped, both seeds and bean reserved
  9. 4 quarter-size slices fresh ginger
  10. Pinch sea salt
  11. 2 tsp ground turmeric
  12. 1/2 tsp ground cinnamon
  13. 1/8th tsp black pepper
  14. 1/4 cup cacao nibs
  15. optional: 1/8th tsp cardamom
  16. optional: 1/4 cup chopped candied ginger
Instructions
  1. First, prep your ingredients: Mix about 2 tablespoons of the coconut milk in a small bowl with the tapioca starch to make a smooth slurry. Set aside.
  2. In a medium to large bowl, mix together the cashew butter and vegan cream cheese and salt with the coconut oil using a plastic spatula, pressing stirring until smooth.
  3. Lastly, fill another large bowl with ice and water and set aside a ziploc bag.
  4. Next, cook the ice cream base: combine the remaining coconut milk base with the sugar, corn syrup in a 4-quart saucepan over medium-high heat until bubbling. Remove the pan from the head and slowly drizzle in the tapioca starch slurry, whisking constantly to incorporate. Return the mixture to heat and bring to a boil over medium-high heat, then reduce to a simmer and let simmer for 30 seconds (until the mixture thickens slightly.) You can test for thickening by dipping a rubber spatula into the mixture then running your finger through the warm mixture on the spatula. If your finger leaves a trail that lasts several seconds, the mixture is amply thickened! Remove from the heat. Add the turmeric, cinnamon, black pepper, cardamom and vanilla seeds and pod, and fresh ginger pieces.
  5. Now, chill your base: gradually whisk the thickened coconut milk base into the smooth cream cheese mixture, stirring until well-incorporated. Then, pour the mixture into a 1-gallon ziploc bag and submerge the bag in the ice bath. Let stand until cold, at least 30 minutes. Add ice as needed, or transfer to the refrigerator to speed the cooking process. Once adequately chilled, remove the vanilla pod and fresh ginger pieces. Then, transfer the mixture to a blender or food processor. (If you have an immersion blender, you can buzz the mixture here to ensure its well combined.) Blend on high for 3 minutes or until the mixture is completely homogenous.
  6. Lastly, freeze your ice cream: remove your frozen ice cream canister from the freezer and assemble your ice cream machine, then turn it on. Remove the chilled base from the ice bath and pour it into the canister. Spin until thick and creamy. Once adequately creamy, pack the ice cream into an airtight storage container, alternating with the cacao nibs and crystalized ginger chunks with scoops of ice cream, and press a sheet of parchment directly against the surface of the cream, then seal with an airtight lid. Freeze in the coldest part of your freezer until firm - roughly 4 hours - and enjoy!
LentineAlexis http://LentineAlexis.com/

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